Tag Archive for Britain rail restructuring

Back to the Future for the UK rail structure? // 2015 review

Was the British Rail privatization effort ever successfully completed. Or just a juggling of the accounting books?

What do you think? Here is an interesting review in part from Zthe Economist in early October 2015 //

The original Railtrack company actually according to many economists was partially re-nationalized when financial oversight shifted to the replacement Network Rail company within about a decade of the initial change.

More passenger riders? Yes. At more public subsidy? Yes.

Is that success?

Quite a few in the UK don’t think it was successful. Note this from The Economist on 3 October 2015 Railways “Gravy trains” Why Labour’s plans to renationalise the railways are so popular

FEW topics get Britons as hot under the collar as the state of the country’s railways. When trains are delayed—at the slightest hint of snow, or when leaves fall on the track—passengers fire off furious letters and tweets. According to polls by YouGov, more than half of Britons would like the government to take the railways back under state control.

This makes Labour’s plan for a publicly run “People’s Railway”, affirmed at its conference this week, a popular policy as well as a radical one.

By some measures Britain’s railways are booming. Since the network was privatised in 1994, the number of train journeys taken each year has doubled. The growth in passenger-kilometres travelled has been among the fastest in the European Union.

BUT… …the service has become far more expensive, with rail fares now 24% higher in real terms than in 1995.

And as well as being pricey, the service is often uncomfortable: 22% of passengers commuting into London and 16% of those travelling into Manchester have to stand.

// The Economist writes that …”passenger frustration also reflects the fact that privatisation was rushed through and in many ways flawed.” When British Rail, the monolithic state operator, was broken up in the 1990s the government stringently followed a European directive to separate the tracks from the trains.

The idea was to boost competition by ensuring that different train operators could whizz up and down the same stretches of track.

But in some circumstances this led to inefficiencies, with employees of privately run train companies doubling up against those from Network Rail, the state-owned company which controls all 20,000 miles (32,000km) of track. Investment has risen since privatisation, but so has government subsidy…

The subsidies adds up to around £4 billion ($6 billion) a year.

According to a report published in 2011, costs per passenger-kilometre have hardly improved since 1996.

And Network Rail is in disarray. The company, which was brought on to the government balance-sheet in 2014 with £34 billion of debt, is due to publish three reports over the next six months looking at how it can be restructured.

Read the column in full at: www.economist.com/news/britain/21669057-why-labours-plans-renationalise-railways-are-so-popular-gravy-trains