Here is how BNSF is growing // with a shift to Stack Trains

Much of the world operates railroads that lack the necessary vertical clearances and the standard 1435mm heavy axle track gauge that allows for double stacking international goods in huge containers.

The World counts containers as 20-foot long boxes. In North America the standard is a whopping 53 feet long box.

Thirty years of big train progress in North America has given the Mexican to Canada rail companies the market ability to sustain self financed rail growth as coal shipments drop in the modern world

What is your railroad doing to adapt?

This story is found in a Bloomberg report.

Railroads are already winning more of this so-called intermodal business here across North America. Rail shipments of containers grew 15 percent over the last decade That offset the traffic losses as other cargoes, such as coal and ores have dropped in some cases by 11 percent to as much as 20 percent in the eastern US coal area.

Intermodal traffic is actually growing on the US railroads by about double GDP and also by about twice the rate of truck over the highway mode. Even with a somewhat slower US economic growth this year— intermodal rail freight is up 2.3 percent in 2015, the Association of American Railroads reports.

But persuading shippers to switch still isn’t always easy to do. It has to be significantly cheaper per trailer or container mile if rail rather than by highway in order for it to be a better transport deal for shippers.

Shippers decide. Not politicians. At least in the US markets.

It is strictly a matter of economics. While it might be cheaper by ton-mile to send freight by rail, it generally takes just a bit longer in time and a bit more in distance rather than by straight trucking from origin to destination.

There is also a cost of transferring containers onto the trains and then back to trucks for final delivery.

All of this geography of intermodal makes it difficult to compete with direct trucking on trips of less than about 600 miles here in North America. That is confirmed in an interview with Larry Gross, a partner at FTR Transportation Intelligence. Trucks are more punctual and flexible. They generally will always be quicker than by a truck to rail to truck intermodal substitute.

For more about the successful private BNSF rail investment report, log onto:    www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-10-07/buffett-bets-on-rail-superhighway-to-beat-trucks-as-coal-fades

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