Fire fighters tell their side of resulting fire from oil train accidents

Cude Oil train in Interstate median in front of cntral Albany capital area Crude Oil Train passing adjacent capital area of Albany NY

From a TV report on 06/08/2015 6:59 PM by WNYT.com ALBANY NEW YORK
By: Samantha DiMascio

(DISCLOSURE: My Uncle Jim was a career fireman in Milwaukee)


Firefighters confronted by catastrophic oil train derailments shared their stories with people in Albany today. It was part of a summit put on by the Albany County Executive, and Sheriff at the College of St. Rose.

Over the last five years, the amount of crude oil traveling through Albany has tripled

One listener said that what we learned today is that you cannot fight the fire, you have to run away from the fire and let it burn out.  That is the same message I received when at a seminar in April in Easton PA.  Mostly we evacuate and let it burn out said the fire marshal in Easton.

A local Albany sheriff said warned that on a bigger scale “we didn’t think about the oil going into the sewer systems, taking out water systems, taking out infrastructure”.  Those are worst case scenarios that we might not be able to handle.

A Battalion Chief from Lynchburg, VA had an oil train derail in his city. He stressed to the audience in Albany the need for depth in the emergency response system. “You’ve got to have people in place to backfill positions, you have to have those command functions filled and people able to come in place of someone else’s absence. Because you cannot just ignore other possible fires and incidents happening in your town while you fight the train fire for multiple days.

To put manpower and equipment resources in perspective, Lac Megantic depleted resources from 85 different fire departments over the course of their three week disaster response. “That would wipe out all of Albany County’s 48 departments and put a sizeable dent in surrounding county services” said one Albany firefighter.  Imagine what that might do in an even larger urban area with more population both residential and working day time employees to possibly evacuate.

Who has calculated that catastrophic risk scenario and how recovery and claims would be paid?

For more go to: http://wnyt.com/article/stories/s3820216.shtml

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